BMW 3 Series (E90, E92) Battery Replacement, Coding and Registration

The battery on my BMW 335i has been failing for months now and I finally got around to replacing, coding and registering it. It’s not a very difficult job and shouldn’t take more than an hour of your time. You will also save at least a few hundred dollars compared to taking it to a dealer or even a local shop. Shop around for batteries as I found this great battery for $100 cheaper than local parts stores or even online! I show the process of removing the battery, choosing the right battery for your car, installing the battery, coding a change if the type of battery is different or the capacity is different and even registering it to tell the car that it’s new.

BMW 335i (E92) Catback Exhaust Install & Sound Clips

I’m the SimpleCarGuy and in this video I remove this old hacked up stock exhaust and install a brand-new stainless-steel cat back kit making my BMW 335i sound like a sports car again! This old stuff was straight piped after the resonator and sounded awful at higher speed, so let’s get rid of it, install the new shiny stuff and see how it sounds after!

With everything out of the box, we can see what comes in this kit and also see the quality of the bends, welds and craftsmanship. I must say that I am very impressed with the quality here and CANNOT wait to hear what it sounds like once installed. Stick around and you won’t be disappointed! Of course before we can install this exhaust, we have to remove the old stuff. To be safe, I put the car on 4 jack stands and couple extra ones in the middle to help me support the exhaust and provide extra safety. If you’d like to see this process in detail, check out the video in the top right corner.

Also, while here let’s not forget to plug up that vacuum line that’s not longer needed.

And there you have it guys, it is not fully installed and ready for the road. So, how difficult was this to install? I hope I captured the difficulty level in the video and it did take me almost 2 hours, but I would say if you are mechanically inclined, it is not impossible to do this safely in your own garage like I did. It looks as good as I expected installed on the car. Finally, let’s go for a drive and check out how it sounds.

Well, that’s all I have for you today and I must say I’m very happy with this exhaust. It’s not overly loud, but still produces a deep growl when you want it to. Most importantly for me, my car no longer sounds like it’s missing a muffler and is much more enjoyable to drive at higher speeds. Now that you know how to install an exhaust system, why not check out how I installed wireless CarPlay in this 10 year old BMW?


BMW E92 Fender Removal DIY

Removing fenders on the BMW 335i (or any E92) is more difficult than I would expect. The main reason is because some of the bolts are just very difficult to get to. Some of them are in the wheel well, some are inside the fender and some are behind the side skirt. In this video I show you how to access all of those bolts and remove the fender. The passenger side has an additional step as it requires the washer fluid bottle to be removed as well.

This BMW 335i Has Been a Headache

In this video I start the journey to finishing my BMW 335i M-Sport by replacing the bumper, fenders and many other little parts like grills, clips, plastics etc. The front end will be painted in the next video, but today we are going through the process of preparing everything yourself as a DIYer.

Vent Tabs and Cup Holder Replacement

I have owned a few BMWs from this era and pretty much all of them have had the little clips fall off or break off making it impossible to adjust where the air conditioning is pointing. Luckily, there are a cheap repair kits like this that will take care of this issue in no time. For me, making the car enjoyable and comfortable to use daily is keeps bringing me back to it and these little fixes is what makes a big difference.

BMW 3 Series (E92) Reverse Camera Install DIY

After installing the wireless CarPlay on my BMW 335i, the only thing that was missing was the reverse camera. Fortunately, this was a very easy add on thanks to the add-on I had already installed in the camera. This $35 dollar camera functions as you would expect and has great quality for the price. Install took me about 90 minutes total and it’s definitely worth it to make the car a lot more modern. Hope it helps you install yours as well!

The Truth About My BMW 335i

Engine Rebuild

Believe it or not, it has been almost 2 years since I got this car and so far I’ve only put on a few thousand miles on it. It’s not because I don’t like driving it or anything like that, but because I got it with a blown engine that tool some time to rebuild. The N55 engine in this BMW 335i was completely destroyed and I learned a ton rebuilding it. It was one of the most fun winter projects I’ve done in a while. I ran into some issues and had to redo a few things, but that’s part of the process. Check out the entire playlist to see it start to finish!

Done Since Rebuild:

Anyway, what has been done since the engine rebuilt? In all honestly, not too much. I have painted the air intake to match the nice engine and make sure no rust or paint chips go into the engine. I replaced, registered and coded the battery to make sure it starts every time and installed Apple CarPlay to make it more modern and enjoyable to drive daily.

What stopping me from driving it all the time:

So, why haven’t I been driving it as much as my BMW Z4 or the i3? Well, the biggest factor for me has been that air conditioning not working. I have attempted to fix it and was not able to find the leak with the bumper and panels in place, so me driving this car has been limited to cold days and evenings.

The second biggest reason has been the front of the car. Not only is the bumper hanging and catches on stuff, but the headlights and the fenders are also in very poor state. As you can see the headlights are glazed and not very clear and the fenders have re-cracked in the location where they have been fixed before.

The next one is fairly minor, but at certain engine load, the car will stutter a little bit on acceleration. I’ve scanned the car already and found a valvetronic code, so I’ll be investigating that as well.

The last biggest annoyance with driving this car has been the exhaust. While I like loud and throaty exhaust and this one sounds almost decent on startup, someone has cut out the mufflers on it and it sounds horrible at higher speed. The drone of the exhaust kills all the fun of driving this car over 45 MPH as it encapsulates the entire cabin.

Plan for the future:

Alright and finally let’s talk about my plan for this BMW! No, I will not be installing the M4 style bumper on this car, but I will be installing this aftermarket M-Sport bumper just like the original OEM. Well, except this one isn’t ripped and hasn’t been repaired a few times in the past. To go with the bumper, I will be replacing the fenders as it was cheaper to buy new aftermarket ones than to fix the original cracked ones. During this process, I will look into the air conditioner again as I could hear it hissing in the general area behind the bumper and it will be the perfect time to find what the issue is. Once I test fit all the parts and make sure everything works well, I’ll take it to a body shop to get painted and hopefully fix the rest of the paint on the car at the same time. After the body shop, I’ll buff out the headlights to make them look new again and try to figure out why the left headlight doesn’t level itself properly making it difficult to drive at night.

Once the car is looking better, it will be time to make it sound great also. For that reason, I have bought this complete exhaust system that I will be installing myself. I CANNOT wait to get this installed and hear what it sounds like! This is stainless steel construction with no welding required and should make a huge difference for drivability and comfort.

A few other minor common issues on these cars I will have to fix are the broken cup holders and the seat belt extender, which are both very easy to replace.

So, there you have it guys, the truth is that I have been saving up to get the parts I needed and wanted so that I can finally finish the transformation. I can’t wait to get working on this and I’m hoping to have everything done in the next couple of months. If you’d like to follow this car from the start, check out my previous videos, subscribe if you’d like to see what happens next and I hope to see you in the next one!


BMW N54 Problems to Expect – Reliability Report

So, you’re looking at a BMW with the N54 engine but you’ve heard that this may not be the most reliable engine in the BMW line up. Hi guys and welcome back to the SimpleCarGuy channel. Today, we will talk about the history, common problems, issues solved over time, how reliable the engine is 15 years later as well as my personal experience.

The reason I’m making this video is because I owned a BMW 335i e92 with the N54 engine for about 4 years from 2013 to 2017 and I wanted to catch myself up and see how the reliability has been since I sold my car! This is also part of a small series where I’m looking into engines I own or have owned and creating reliability reports like this video. BMW N55 video is coming up soon, so subscribe to see it and hit that like button to support the channel!

History/Background:

BMW N54 is one of the best straight six engines every made by BMW for a few very good reasons. Not only was it the first mass produced BMW turbocharged engine, but it also came with a forged crankshaft and connecting rods leaving HUGE tuning potential. Even though the stock engine made 302 HP, it’s not very difficult to get it up to 500hp or even much, much more. So, how can this reward winning engine [show which awards] have issues? Well, while the actual engine has had some amazing innovations and engineering, a lot of the accessories and  auxiliary components are not as well designed. Of course, when looking at a used BMW with the N54 engine, it doesn’t help that a lot of them have been tuned and driven hard! [HUGE tuning potential and people love it, but also abuse it] So, let’s take a look at some common problems you can expect on a BMW N54 engine

Common Issues:

Even though there were 3 different power figures for this engine, mechanically its basically the same engine. I’ll go over the difference between the standard N54B30 and the N54B30TO that was used in the 1 Series M Coupe and Z4 sDrive35is.

N54B30

  1. HPFP

Let’s start with the stand N54B30 engine. The biggest and most common issue that has haunted the BMW N54 engine since the start is the HPFP going bad and preventing the engine from starting, sometimes stuttering, misfiring or running well in general. It was such a big issue that BMW has extended the warranty on these to 10 years and 120,000 miles in the United States. The good part here is that most of the cars have already had the pump replaced with a revised version while under warranty.

  • Water Pump

Another big common problem on the N54 engine is the electric water pump that uses some plastic parts. These fail unexpectedly and usually at the worst time! I’ve had 2 OEM water pumps fail on me when I had the car. I got the yellow triangle saying that the engine is running hot and within 2 minutes a red triangle with a message saying to drive moderately and to shut off the engine as it has overheating. Unlike the HPFP, there is no extended warranty or anything like that and unfortunately, the pump is very difficult to get to. I paid around a $1000 each time it failed in Chicago. The pump is about $400 and labor is at least that much again.

  • Fuel Injectors leaking, Ignition Coils

These engines also suffer from leaky injectors. BMW N54 uses direct injection and these must be very precise for the engine to run correctly. Unfortunately, when they start leaking which  can cause many different problems including hard to start engine once warmed up, rough idle and misfires as well as terrible fuel economy among other issues. Of course, some of these symptoms can be caused by a bad spark plug or coil and I would definitely recommend replacing those before touching the injectors as each injector is about $250.

  • Turbochargers/wastegate rattle – people upgrade them for more power

Next issue that’s common on many BMW engines including the N54 is the wastegate rattle. Early on, this isn’t a huge issue as it mostly just makes a rattling noise on start up, it gets worse and worse over time. Eventually, the wastegate flapper starts leaking boost and causing performance issues. If not taken care of at this stage, the ECU will try to compensate for the lack of boost potentially overheating and destroying the turbocharger and maybe even the engine if metal gets into the intake. In addition to the wastegate rattle issue, turbo seals can fail and cause smoke out of the exhaust. These issues are more common on tuned or hard driven cars. Small piece of advice here is to not punch it hard until the engine is fully warmed up and to let the engine idle for a little while after driving hard before shutting off the car. [explain why let it idle][Aftermarket upgrades are very popular.]

  • Leaks become more common once getting closer to 100k

If you have watched my BMW N20 engine video [link it], this will sound very familiar. There are a few oil leaks to watch out for and the most common one is the valve cover oil leak. Usually, the plastic valve cover will crack and start leaking. Sometimes the gasket goes bad as well and the entire cover should be replaced. It’s important to get this done quickly as it would be leaking on the exhaust manifold, turbos and the O2 sensors. The oil filter housing gasket is also prone to leaking and should be replaced ASAP as it will leak oil onto the serpentine belt and can cause all kinds of problems. Oil pan leaks are less common, but possible.

  • Chargepipe

The next common issue on these engines is the chargepipe that cracks over time. BMW used a plastic pipe between the intercooler and the intake manifold which runs under boost a lot of times and of course becomes brittle and eventually fails. I’ve had this fail on my N55 [n55] engine as it uses the same design and replaced it with an aftermarket one that works much better. This is an easy and inexpensive fix to a common problem.

  • Minor items:

There are of course many other little issues with these engines that you may need to take care of over time, such as the starters going bad out of no where [link N20 video] or VANOS solenoids causing loss of power, engine hesitation, rough idle and decreased fuel economy. I have actually made a video on how to test and clean these if you’re interested and they are a decently simple DIY. Carbon build up is another issue that shows up on many lists, but that’s common on most direct injected engine and not BMW or this engine specific.

N54B30TO

As I mentioned earlier, N54B30TO was the more powerful version of the N54 engine making 335HP, but this was achieved mostly by adding a performance power kit tune and some supporting cooling hardware. [list: upgraded fan, radiator hoses, secondary radiator, oil cooler]. So, the engine itself was the same but with just a little more boost. This also means that all problems we have discussed so far are also present on this version of the engine as well.

Best and Worst Years:

Now 15 years after it has been released and after so many problems, should you even be looking at buying one? Luckily, this engine has had somewhat of a cult following lately and is becoming sought after in the tuner’s world. This also means that most people are trying to preserve it and maintain it properly. Additionally, issues like the HPFP and injectors have been resolved from the dealer and mostly done under warranty. Most other issues have been figured out in the aftermarket world with the upgraded turbochargers to get rid of the wastergate rattle and metal chargepipes to prevent boost leaks. One word of advice, avoid getting an already tuned engine if you plan on dailying your ride. [notes on why not]

Personal Experience:

A quick note on my personal experience with the engine. Over the period of 4 years and about 55,000 miles, I had to replace the spark plugs, ignition coils and 2 water pumps and nothing else. In every video I’ve made about the BMW engines I’ve owned, people tell me I just got lucky and that may be true, but it doesn’t hurt to properly take care of these engines as well.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, remember that this is an aging BMW motor that was packed with top-of-the-line technology and most likely driven hard by the last owners, so be ready to spend a little bit of money on maintaining it properly. It’s a wonderful, powerful and still one of the more reliable engines made by BMW with lots of aftermarket support and capability to produce tremendous power! Check out my BMW N20 and N63 engine reliability reports and stay tunes for the N55 video as well. Thank you so much for watching and I’ll see you in the next one!

BMW N55 Engine Rebuild Project Part 10 – BMW Crank, No Start Troubleshooting

Has this been the longest project ever or is this just how YouTube driven projects go? Welcome back to the last video in the BMW N55 engine rebuild series. This BMW 335i N55 project has been one of the most fun for me, but also one of the more frustrating projects I have ever done. In this video, I will show you what else I did after installing the engine, there are plenty of things to do while doing a swap on a car this age. I will also go through the steps I took and all of the things I tried to get it started when it would crank forever, but not start. This crank, but no start condition took a lot of my time and you will never guess what it was.. I felt a little dumb after figuring it out. At the very least, there will be some kind of conclusion by the end of the video, but before we get there, let me remind you what happened in the last video.

After rebuilding the engine, I installed the high-pressure fuel pump, oil filter housing and of course the VANOS solenoids. Then I ran the fuel lines to the fuel pump as well as to the injectors and on the other side I installed the new exhaust manifold with the turbocharger. At the front side of the engine, I installed all of the pulleys, the vibration damper and then I ran the wiring looms. After doing the rest of the small parts, the engine was ready to be put into the car and connected to the transmissions. Of course, there is a lot more to it, but I was able to try starting it at that point. If you’d like to see details, check out the previous video in this playlist.

Now, before we move on, don’t forget to hit that like button to support the channel and subscribe if you’d like to see more from me!

Right after installing the engine and the rest of the necessities, I scanned the car for codes and deleted anything that was in the history. Then I turned on the ignition to see what would happen. I heard the fuel pump come on and the water pump started pumping and building up pressure as well. These were good signs! Prior to this, there were no signs of life coming from the engine and the fix for that was a ground wire that wasn’t making good contact. Now I was able to scan the DME and the rest of the modules and I was sure the engine would start. I’ve connected my other car for some power annnnnd this is all I got in return. (Play starting click 7077). The engine would crank for as long as you had battery power, but would not start.

This is where I started to think really, really hard as to what could be causing this engine not to start. Sure, I still didn’t have the exhaust or axles or some of the sensors installed, but the engine SHOULD HAVE STARTED now!

From my basic understanding the engine needs 4 things to start: air, fuel, spark and compression. So, I started checking one at a time from the easiest to the hardest. I knew the engine was getting air since there was no obstructions or even air filter installed at this stage. This wasn’t the problem. I then checked the spark. I pulled one of the sparkplugs out and cranked the engine. It was nice and bright, so now I was certain that the spark was not the issue, but what about the fuel? Is the engine getting proper fuel? I was expecting the low pressure fuel pump to turn on each time I was about to start the car as it seems to be that way on my Z4 and it’s the same platform. However, it did not. I was worried the fuel wasn’t getting to the fuel rail. So. I grabbed my ThinkTool Scanner and looked at the data stream for the rail pressure. I had a perfect 12 mPa or about 1750psi of pressure. That’s definitely plenty to make the engine go. To triple check that it wasn’t a fuel issue, I connected a cheap-o oscilloscope to the injector to see that it was getting a signal to fire.. which it was. Now the only thing that was left was compression. Unfortunately, I don’t have compression readings on video but all 6 cylinders were at about 180 PSI, which is just fine for this engine and would not be a cause for the engine not to start.

But of course, with modern engines, even if you have all that you need, your engine still may not start if the computer tells it not to. Or at least that was my thought at the time. I connected any and all sensors that I could find, cleared the codes and tried again. At this time the only code that was present on the car was A738: JBE Power Supply Interrupted. My next mission was to figure out what this code was about and how to fix it. Since I had no other codes, I was certain this would be the solution to my no start issue. As the first step, I bought a used JBE module off eBay and swapped it out. The job is fairly easy, but you do have to remove half of the interior on the passenger side to get to the module. After 30 minutes, I was ready to give it another go.. but unfortunately, it made no difference in my case. The code remained active.

At the same time, I noticed that the car would no longer lock using the button on the inside or even from the key fob. This had to be the issue as the key communication is vital to the engine starting.

Electronics are definitely not my strongest skill set when it comes to cars, but with a help of a few friends online, I tracked many wires, checked resistance on certain wires, replaced fuses and relays, but the JBE code remained active. In the last-ditch effort, I bought the entire fuse box online to see if it would make any difference. Replacing the fuse box didn’t take too much time as I’ve already had good access, but the main power wire that came in did give me some trouble. I knew these are a common failure point on these cars, so it was important not to damage anything. Fifteen minutes later, the new fuse box was in! I erased the codes one more time and guess what?? The JBE Code was gone! I was ecstatic and 100% expecting the engine to fire up.. but guess what? Now I had ZERO codes and the same no start condition I’ve been dealing with for weeks now.

My engine had everything it would need, so what else could it be? I know the computer needs to know position of the engine when it’s cranking in order to have it timed properly, so I decided to check the crankshaft sensor. I removed the starter and tested to make 5 volts were getting to the sensor. All was good there. Since I was running out of options and wanted to rule out as many things as possible, I ordered a used one online for a few bucks and replaced it and as you guessed it, nothing changed.

I then replaced the camshaft sensors, using the old ones I had from the original engine and even swapped out the VANOS solenoids in case they went bad somehow and even updated the DME, JBE, CAS and other modules to the latest firmware. All to no avail.

Since the engine wouldn’t start at this point, I figured I’d get busy with finishing the rest of the items on my list and hoping that at some point the solution will come to me or someone will give me a suggestion I can try. The first item for me was re-attaching the rest of the exhaust. When I initially removed it while removing the engine, I had to cut off the bolts as they were rusted on and wouldn’t come off any other way. That meant removing them from the catalytic converter, getting new downpipe exhaust gaskets and a set of new bolts. It all came together rather nicely after that. After re-hanging the rest of the exhaust and tightening the enforcement plates, it was ready to roar.. well once it starts.

Of course, in order for the car to move or even be lowered from the jack stands, I needed to put the front axles back in. I have a video on how to remove these and as they say, the installation is just the opposite of removal. Only catch here is to use new seals and of course a new axle nut. Once both of the axles were in, I could fill the front differential with gear oil.

Many of you suggested installing an aftermarket charge pipe, so I got a VRSF kit. I swapped the sensor and got it in place. It’s an easy upgrade and seemed to be made of quality material, definitely a better quality over the OEM charge pipe that cracks after a couple of installs or removals not to mention it looks much better.

While working on all of these items and thinking back to all of the suggestions and help I got from wonderful BMW enthusiasts online, I went over the possibilities in my head over and over again. What could possibly make the engine not start when it clearly has everything it needs. 

The only logical explanation at this point was that the engine wasn’t timed properly. BUT HOW? I have reviewed the video I have made on replacing the timing chain and it was done correctly, everything lined up and the engine was in Top Dead Center.. or was it? Let’s investigate.

I couldn’t think of any way to actually test this so I went to work taking off the valve cover and everything that was in the way. The entire process took me about an hour and a half total and that was mostly because I could get the gasket to stay in place when reassembly. I’m moving ahead of myself here, but after taking off the valve cover here is what I found. VIDEO I got to work making sure the timing was perfect this time and still wondering how could I mess up this bad. I have re-watched my video on the timing chain replacement and you can clearly see that the timing was done correctly. Then I remembered that last minute I decided to replace the chain components for new ones and that’s when I must have rotated  has cost me hours and hours of troubleshooting, but I don’t blame myself too much as I learned a ton as to what makes the engine go and what it needs to start. Would I have been happier if it started a couple months ago when I first installed it? Absolutely, but, at the end, the engine is now running and I can’t be happier! There are many other things I want to do on this car once the budget allows, so stay tuned!

Well guys, this might be the longest video I have ever done and if you stuck to the very end, thank you! Let me know in the comments what mistakes you’ve done doing big projects like this and how did you figure it out. I’m curious to know and maybe it’ll make me feel just a little better about this one. Thanks for watching and I’ll see you in the next one!

BMW N55 Engine Rebuild Project Part 9 – Engine Install and Assembly

It has been over a month and if you are following my BMW N55 Engine rebuild project, you might be wondering what the heck happened and why haven’t I posted a video on the rest of the assembly, install of the engine and of course the engine running! This isn’t because I haven’t been working on it or the lack of trying, but mostly because I ran into a very major, what I assume to be electrical issue that I am not equipped or knowledgeable enough to fix. I wanted my last video in the rebuild series to be where I start the engine at the very end, but unfortunately, it will not be this video. The video where I explain what I have tried and my results is coming up shortly, but in this video, I will go over the remaining assembly and installation of the engine.

But before I continue, check out the BMW N55 engine rebuild playlist from the beginning if this is your first video here and hit that like button for the YouTube algorithm to help out the channel, it’s free!

In the last couple videos in this series, I installed the front and rear crankshaft seals, the valve and oil pan gaskets and the injectors. Now, of course there is still plenty left to do at this point, so I installed the high-pressure fuel pump. I’ve decided not a get a new one and reused the one that came on the original engine. Of course, I got a new O ring installed on it to make sure there were no leaks in the future. With the fuel pump installed, I could then install the oil filter housing, once again, renewing the gaskets as this is a very common spot for oil to leak from on these engines. I then torqued the bolts to spec as I mention in the video.

Some of you will no doubt comment below asking why haven’t I replaced this or that or upgraded certain parts and it’s an easy guess , it all comes to down to cost. Just like with any other project, there is a budget limitation and I have set myself a limited budget for the engine and car. If you don’t like the sound of that, don’t worry! I’ll be looking for my next project in a few short months and I’ll be modifying and upgrading at the same time of the rebuild on that one. Or least that’s my plan. This project was proving to myself that I can rebuild an engine without anyone’s help. Anyway, as you can see, I have also reused the VANOS solenoid. These tested just fine and I gave them a good clean right before installing.

At this point, things started moving a little faster. I installed the high-pressure fuel lines from the fuel pump to the injectors. You want to use a crowfoot wrenches to torque these down and prevent fuel leaks in the future.

With this side of the engine looking a little more complete, it was time to switch to the other side and install the exhaust manifold with the turbocharger.

I scraped remnants of the old gaskets out, cleaned the area and then installed them one by one. They should fit on there snuggly and will be crushed when the assembly is installed and torqued down. The O rings on the oil lines are a quick swap for a set of new ones and it’s time to marry it to the engine. I suggest angling the engine a little more or have someone help you as it can be a little awkward to get it in there and put the first couple bolts in at the same time. A cordless drill makes a quick work of getting the flange nuts finger tight and then it’s time for the torque wrench to get these up to spec. It’s important not to retighten them after the first or second round and follow the procedure exactly if you don’t want to have exhaust leaks in the future. Off camera, I also attached and torqued down the turbo oil lines as well as the bracket below the turbo housing itself and after some more plumbing, this side of the engine is done for now.

I then switched to the front of the engine and the first item on my list was to switch over the belt tensioner from the old block to the newly built engine. This is one of those items I didn’t really think about at the time of building the engine, but I would definitely recommend switching out the idler pulley for a new one. This might be a future DIY I will tackle with the engine in the car. In the meantime, I install the vibration damper, which now I have learned would have benefited from a front crank seal guard plate, you live and you learn! If any of you think of doing something like this at home, it’s honestly worth it just for the amount of engine knowledge you will get in the return, not to mention the patience! Anyway, I drop the front differential in place and torque it to spec. Next on the list is the water pump, this sucker just goes in and with a help of a couple bolts it’s in place.

Most of the big items are now installed, so I install the engine support that will attach to the engine mount and then the heatshield above the exhaust manifold that holds the vacuum regulator. I then position the spark plug and injector wires in their place, torque down the spark plugs and then install the ignition coils. The top of the engine is pretty much done at this stage and I can proceed to installing the wiring loom on the front of the engine. There are lots of small little wires going everywhere here, but luckily, they all seem to just be long enough to plug into the sensor or part that it’s supposed to. The plugs are different between them most of the time as well. One important item here is to not forget the ground wire on the bottom left corner of the engine. The same goes for the intake side of the engine, the bird nest of wires slides onto the engine and then I start sorting them out and plugging in what I can. The rest will be plugged in once the ECU and the rest of the intake sensors are close by.

Look at this beauty now! It’s starting to look more and more like a real engine and at this point I’m getting really excited to get this finished and put it back in the car, but before I get too excited, we still have to install a couple of parts. If you are wondering why am I struggling with this on the engine hoist, well.. it was impossible to do while on the engine stand as the engine stand was in the way of the bolts for the flywheel and I couldn’t think of any other way of doing this at the time.

And now for one of my favorite shots of this video, I love how after weeks of working on this engine and replacing most of the parts on the inside, it slides into the engine bay and is ready to be connected to its life lines. One of the struggles I had here is getting the AC compressor to go around the engine. I chose not to disconnect it as I don’t’ have the equipment to draw off the refrigerant in the system and having to call someone in sounded like a hassle.

THE END:

Well, this part was filmed over a month ago and OH how I wish it went to plan. The engine was supposed to fire up at that point and after some finishing touches, I would be enjoying my BMW 335i and all the work I have put into it. Unfortunately, it did not go to plan from this point on and the engine wouldn’t start. It would crank for as long as the battery would allow, but would not fire or even sputter. With that in mind, it’s time to end this video as it’s already far longer than I wanted it to be, but I wanted to show each step. Subscribe to the channel to stay tuned and to find out what I have tried so far to get the engine started. The list is long and I think you will find it interesting where my head was going troubleshooting this engine. That’s all for now, thank you so much for watching and I will see you in the next one!